Damien Hirst’s footage of smashing Claridge’s Basker records will be converted to NFT

He recently set fire to his own multimillion-pound paintings, but Damien Hirst got his first taste of art destruction 12 years ago.

At the time, he was recruited by Busker and musician Daniel Spiler, 43, to help destroy his recordings before his eyes in the name of Art.

The couple spent hours breaking records with a log and poker in their suite at Claridge’s – one of the most expensive hotels in the world.

Now, historical day footage is set to become available for the first time – in the form of a non-fungible token (NFT).

Weeks after Hearst set his own paintings on fire, a video of him smashing a CD by Spiller’s former band The Broken Record Project will be auctioned off as digital artwork.

The couple spent hours breaking records with a log and poker in their suite at Claridge's - one of the most expensive hotels in the world.  Pictured: a shot of the trick

The couple spent hours breaking records with a log and poker in their suite at Claridge’s – one of the most expensive hotels in the world. Pictured: a shot of the trick

Weeks after Hearst set his own paintings on fire, a video of him smashing a CD of former Mr. Spiller's band The Broken Record Project will be auctioned as a digital artwork

Weeks after Hearst set his own paintings on fire, a video of him smashing a CD of former Mr. Spiller’s band The Broken Record Project will be auctioned as a digital artwork

At the time, he was recruited by Busker and musician Daniel Spiler, 43, to help destroy his recordings before his eyes in the name of Art.

At the time, he was recruited by Busker and musician Daniel Spiler, 43, to help destroy his recordings before his eyes in the name of Art.

NFT is authenticated by the blockchain, which confirms its authenticity and ownership. It can be purchased with cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin and Ether – the currency of the Ethereum network.

Spiller approached Hearst, along with several other celebrities including Boris Johnson and comedian Hugh Dennis, to promote the controversial stunt.

The 57-year-old British artist was so moved by the idea that he invited the singer, who is now commuting in South Bank, London, to one of the world’s most expensive hotel suites for a day.

The pair spent “wild” hours together destroying music, and Mr. Spiller said Hearst was so excited about the adventure that he hung the smashed disc from his nose as part of a “funny” gag.

Damien was awesome. ‘His generosity with time and spirit was incredible,’ said Mr. Spiller.

Spieler approached Hearst, along with several other celebrities including Boris Johnson (pictured also participating in the stunt)

Spieler approached Hearst, along with several other celebrities including Boris Johnson (pictured also participating in the stunt)

Hearst's last Currency collection saw 4,851 out of 10,000 of his A4 boards catch fire and turn into NFTs

Hearst’s last Currency collection saw 4,851 out of 10,000 of his A4 boards catch fire and turn into NFTs

He spent hours talking, asking questions, serving beer, he was incredibly welcoming. He liked the concept and seemed to enjoy the depravity and understanding of the artistic meaning.

During the CD destruction process, Mr. Spiller said he “sings” Hearst by singing and playing guitar.

“Artistic destruction, as I made it in front of him… It seemed to me that it touched him on an artistic level,” he said.

“I remember thinking to myself, ”I’m wandering off the street but sitting with the most expensive artist in the world, in his suite in the most expensive hotel, and gently singing in his ear as he beats my music.. How utterly surreal.”

Today’s video was nearly lost until Mr. Spiller found it in the trash he was taking to the ledge, only realizing when the bag came apart and its contents spilled.

Inside were fragments of the log and log that Hearst had used to smash the CD he had signed as well.

Spiller says Hearst’s latest collection of The Currency, which saw 4,851 of 10,000 A4 plates set on fire and converted into NFTs, reminded him of “artistic ruin.”

“I thought of Claridge’s big fireplace, and the wood and poker used for smashing,” he said.

“Destruction is a powerful visual and typical of Damien’s brilliance.

Since we shared that day twelve years ago, I’ve continued to work in London and continued his reign at the top as the world’s most creative and most prized artist – and that tells you a lot about his charm.

Digital artwork will be auctioned on the musician’s website danielspiller.com In the coming weeks, taking care to get their hands on unseen footage, and signed history, they are able to score their interest now.

Spiller already had some “fun proposals” for alternative payment methods – including swapping out his NFT for one of Hirst’s recent polka dot art collection.

“Destroying my art had meaning and value to me, as well as making a fuss,” he said, adding that one day he might show the other broken videos in a gallery.

“There’s something powerful about the dark, almost grainy footage of my art getting destroyed.”

Other celebrities also participated in stunts throughout the same year. fix He had great success with Dennis, Lieutenant Colonel Verne Cotton and Boris Johnson, who would years later become Prime Minister.

Spiller revealed that he only succeeded in getting the former prime minister on board after sneaking into a party Johnson was with a friend of theirs.

Mr. Spiller reached out to many artists to share his stunts in 2010

Mr. Spiller reached out to many artists to share his stunts in 2010

“I went near him and asked him if he would ruin some music, he thought it was a trap,” he said.

Johnson said he didn’t want to be filmed looking like he was destroying something, fearing it might be taken out of context later.

But Spiller said he quickly gained Johnson’s trust and “the latter entered her soul”.

“It was so much fun…he grabbed the music by the hand, tightened his fist, and finally announced to everyone that the record had been broken,” Spiller recalls.

When the camera was turned off, he whispered he enjoyed everything and said it was a great idea.

“It was great.”

Spiller now hopes the sale of Hirst NFT will help turn his “recent misfortune” — after his business was hit hard during the pandemic.

“It’s been tough lately, and enthusiasts seem to be paying a heavy price – the pandemic means we’ve lost our performance spots on the subway, turnout is still low, and the cashless community now makes it even more difficult,” he said.

‘Tough lately? Yes, but that doesn’t hide the fact that I love what I do – sharing music with people is the greatest fun – seeing how they brighten their day.

Mr. Spiller reached out to many artists to share his stunts in 2010

Mr. Spiller reached out to many artists to share his stunts in 2010

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